50 Animals Who Have Not Found Their Color (with Surprise Bonus)

Nature has endowed beings with a variety of colors. Sometimes it simply happens that a specimen appears into the world after “after they have forgotten the paints at home.” It is simply because the body has not what it takes to catch the color.

Genetic anomaly that prevents pigmentation is called albinism. Genetic mutation causes melanin (the fundamental contributing factor that determines how the skin, hair/feathers and eyes look like) to be missing completely or mostly 1)Albino Animals” by Kelly Milner Halls, book published by Millbrook Press in 2004. The result is often spectacular. Of course, rarity (sometimes extreme) can make an albino animal a star. But it is something beyond that: Colorless, that body can reveal an unexpected beauty.

A similar genetic abnormality is leucism, which consists of a reduction in all pigments, not just melanin 2)”Macropod Husbandry, Healthcare and Medicinals” by Lynda Staker, book published in 2014. Even though in such cases one can see a hint of color or a surface that is only very close to white, the result can be just as spectacular.

The difference between albinism and leucism is not always obvious. Sometimes there are signs such as redness around the eyes which can be observed in some animals with albinism. Sometimes even experts have difficulty telling what it is without examining closely. But it may not matter so much; at least for us, ordinary viewers.

Prepare for a journey like you have never seen. Here two “worlds” become parallel: animals with and without color!


  1. Gorilla

    The most famous albino animal is Floquet of Neu (Snowflake), a gorilla who lived between 1966 and 2003 (most of his life) in Barcelona Zoo, being a great attraction there 3)Snowflake (gorilla)” in Wikipedia. According to some experts, it is the most photographed animal of all time. It is the same gorilla shown on the left. Nor could it be otherwise, since it is the only known white gorilla!

    Albino gorilla
    Gorilla

  2. Alligator

    Another famous albino animal is the alligator Claude, which can be admired at California Academy of Sciences from San Francisco. He even has a page on Facebook! Albino alligators are extremely rare – about 1 in 100,000 eggs 4)Albino Animals” by Kelly Milner Halls, book published by Millbrook Press in 2004. They are even harder to find because they can only survive for a day in the wild. Lack of UV protection is destructive to them. Claude is very lucky: he was found on time and has optimal conditions for survival.

    Alligator

  3. Koala

    And a koala is very popular among albino animals. This one lives in the San Diego Zoo and is called Onya-Birri (boy ghost, as the Australian Aborigines called him.). Stories have been told about other such koalas by various people and it is known that there are such specimens in the wild, but he alone could be studied by researchers.

    Albino koala (Photo: Bill Kuffrey / CC BY 2.0)
    Albino koala (Photo: Bill Kuffrey / CC BY 2.0)
    Common Koala (Photo: Brian Gratwicke / CC BY 2.0)
    Common Koala (Photo: Brian Gratwicke / CC BY 2.0)
  4. Peacock

    Undoubtedly, the peacock is one of the most beautiful creatures. Even white, lacking its shiny colors, it remains a spectacular sight. Although rare, there are several white peacocks, but most are leucistic. Albino peacocks are extremely rare. Regardless of the genetic abnormality, white peacocks look almost the same and they have the same existential problem: they mate with more difficultly. Peacocks see ultraviolet 5)What a peacock sees when it looks at a potential mate – and what your dog actually sees when you throw a ball” by Rob Waugh, article published in Daily Mail on july 3, 2012- they practically do not distinguish between the colors they have, but those “eyes” of the plumage are significant in courtship. The white peacocks, however impressive their plumage may be, does not have the “charming” pattern.

    White Peacock (Photo: Nanimo / CC BY 2.0)
    White Peacock (Photo: Nanimo / CC BY 2.0)
     Ordinary Peacock (Photo: Addie VanDreumel / CC BY-ND 2.0)
    Ordinary Peacock (Photo: Addie VanDreumel / CC BY-ND 2.0)
  5. Horse

    White horses can often be seen. Then you ask yourself: Can horses be albino?! Yup. And you can even see the difference. Especially in their eyes.

    Albino horse (Photo: © Zuzule)
    Albino horse (Photo: © Zuzule)
    Ordinary white horse
    Ordinary white horse (if it can be called “usual” this beautiful)
  6. Skunk

    Even if it’s “stinky”, the skunk is such a cutie and has a great personality. But what’s left to it if it’s all white?!

    Albino skunk
    Skunk

  7. Rattlesnake

    Albino snakes have no chance of survival in the wild. Simply because the sun burns them. They realize this and try to take shelter, but their tissues are already seriously affected. Like when you stay too long on the beach. Only that snakes do not really get to the ER.

    Albino rattlesnake (Photo: Tambako The Jaguar / CC BY-ND 2.0)
    Albino rattlesnake (Photo: Tambako The Jaguar / CC BY-ND 2.0)
    Ordinary rattlesnake (Photo: Jeff Love / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary rattlesnake (Photo: Jeff Love / CC BY 2.0)
  8. Rabbit

    White bunnies are virtually a symbol of cuteness. Anyone have seen one, even in a picture. In particular, rabbits are animals who exhibit albinism frequently. For example, the entire breed of New Zealand White rabbits has albinism 6)Simple Beauty: In Praise of the New Zealand White” by Suzanne Rubins, but there are also other breeds. As they multiply in the farms, you realize that there are so many!

    Albino rabbit (Photo: Tomi Tapio K / CC BY 2.0)
    Albino rabbit (Photo: Tomi Tapio K / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary rabbit
    Ordinary rabbit
  9. Turtle

    Without their natural camouflage, albino turtle chicks are an easy prey. Speed does not help and the shell is not sufficiently protective. So it’s extremely rare that one can find an albino turtle in nature.

    Albino turtle
    Albino turtle
    Ordinary turtle (Photo: Brent Moore / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary turtle (Photo: Brent Moore / CC BY 2.0)
  10. Squirrel

    A white squirrel is a sensational appearance! But did you know that there is another kind of squirrel that makes an impression just as strong? Just wait until the end.

    Albino squirrel (Photo: Lauren Liston / CC BY 2.0)
    Albino squirrel (Photo: Lauren Liston / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary squirrel (Photo: Rene Schwietzke / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary squirrel (Photo: Rene Schwietzke / CC BY 2.0)
  11. Axolotl

    Axolotl, also known as Mexican walking fish, is a bizarre creature. But this underwater salamander is even more bizarre when it preserves its whitish color. In cases of albinism, its eyes are golden; in cases of leucism, its eyes are black.

    Albino axolotl
    Axolotl

  12. Blackbuck

    Albino blackbuck (Photo: © Bhattpratik89)
    Albino blackbuck (Photo: © Bhattpratik89)
    Blackbuck (Photo: Dhruvaraj S / CC BY 2.0)
    Blackbuck (Photo: Dhruvaraj S / CC BY 2.0)
  13. Hedgehog

    Albino hedgehog (Photo: © Belizar)
    Albino hedgehog (Photo: © Belizar)
    Ordinary hedgehog
    Ordinary hedgehog
  14. Hummingbird

    Albino/leucistic hummingbird (Photo: © Stevebyland)
    Albino/leucistic hummingbird (Photo: © Stevebyland)
    Ordinary hummingbird (Photo: Curt Hart / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary hummingbird (Photo: Curt Hart / CC BY 2.0)
  15. Porcupine

    Albino porcupine (Photo: © Anankkml)
    Albino porcupine (Photo: © Anankkml)
    Ordinary porcupine
    Ordinary porcupin
  16. Raccoon

    Leucistic raccoon (Photo: © Anankkml)
    Leucistic raccoon (Photo: © Anankkml)
    Ordinary raccoon
    Ordinary raccoon
  17. Alligator gar

    This fish only has some similarities with alligators without being related to them.(Unless he had any lost relatives in the family tree.)

    Albino alligator gar(Photo: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Southeast Region / CC BY 2.0)
    Albino alligator gar (Foto: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Southeast Region / CC BY 2.0)
    Alligator gar (Photo: shankar s. / CC BY 2.0)
    Alligator gar (Photo: shankar s. / CC BY 2.0)
  18. Brown-hooded kingfisher

    Albino brown-hooded kingfisher (Photo: Ian White / CC BY-ND 2.0)
    Albino brown-hooded kingfisher(Photo: Ian White / CC BY-ND 2.0)
    Ordinary brown-hooded kingfisher (Photo: Stuart Bassil / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary brown-hooded kingfisher (Photo: Stuart Bassil / CC BY 2.0)
  19. Wels catfish

    Albino wels catfish (Photo: USFWS Mountain-Prairie / CC BY 2.0)
    Albino wels catfish (Photo: USFWS Mountain-Prairie / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary wels catfish (Photo: Jenni Douglas / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary wels catfish (FPhoto: Jenni Douglas / CC BY 2.0)
  20. Coati

    Albino coati (Photo: Tambako The Jaguar / CC BY-ND 2.0)
    Albino coati (Photo: Tambako The Jaguar / CC BY-ND 2.0)
    Ordinary coati (Photo: Neil McIntosh / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary coati (Photo: Neil McIntosh / CC BY 2.0)
  21. Cobra

    Albino cobra (Photo: Walter / CC BY 2.0)
    Albino cobra (Photo: Walter / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary cobra (Photo: Tony Austin / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary cobra (Photo: Tony Austin / CC BY 2.0)
  22. Crawfish

    Albino crawfish (Photo: Charles Barilleaux / CC BY 2.0)
    Albino crawfish (Photo: Charles Barilleaux / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary crawfish (Photo: John / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary crawfish (Photo: John / CC BY 2.0)
  23. Stag

    Albino stag (Photo: Adrian Korte / CC BY 2.0)
    Albino stag (Photo: Adrian Korte / CC BY 2.0)
    Stag on snow
    Stag on snow
  24. Donkey

    Albino donkey (Photo: Tristan Ferne / CC BY 2.0)
    Albino donkey (Photo: Tristan Ferne / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary donkey
    Ordinary donkey
  25. Ferret

    Albino ferret (Photo: Tambako The Jaguar / CC BY-ND 2.0)
    Albino ferret (Photo: Tambako The Jaguar / CC BY-ND 2.0)
    Ordinary ferret (Photo: USFWS Mountain-Prairie / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary ferret (Photo: USFWS Mountain-Prairie / CC BY 2.0)
  26. African clawed frog

    Albino african clawed frog (Photo: Daniel Jolivet / CC BY 2.0)
    Albino african clawed frog (Photo: Daniel Jolivet / CC BY 2.0)
    African clawed frog (Photo: Brian Gratwicke / CC BY 2.0)
    African clawed frog (Photo: Brian Gratwicke / CC BY 2.0)
  27. Guinea pig

    Albino guinea pig (Photo: Sarah / CC BY 2.0)
    Albino guinea pig (Photo: Sarah / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary guinea pig (Photo: David Masters / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary guinea pig (Photo: David Masters / CC BY 2.0)
  28. Sparrow

    Albino sparrow
    Sparrow

  29. Guppy

    Albino guppy (Photo: Inka Crabs / CC BY 2.0)
    Albino guppy (Photo: Inka Crabs / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary guppy (Photo: William Warby / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary guppy (Photo: William Warby / CC BY 2.0)
  30. Kangaroo

    Albino kangaroo (Photo: Cyron / CC BY 2.0)
    Albino kangaroo (Photo: Cyron / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary kangaroo (Photo: Alikai / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary kangaroo (Photo: Alikai / CC BY 2.0)
  31. Kudu

    Albino kudu
    Kudu

  32. Convict cichlid

    Albino convict cichlid
    Convict cichlid

  33. Lava lizard

    Albino lava lizard (Photo: Aaron Logan / CC BY 2.0)
    Albino lava lizard (Photo: Aaron Logan / CC BY 2.0)
    Lava lizard (Photo: Paul Krawczuk / CC BY 2.0)
    Lava lizard (Photo: Paul Krawczuk / CC BY 2.0)
  34. Mockingbird

    Albino mockingbird (Photo: glenn_e_wilson / CC BY 2.0)
    Albino mockingbird (Photo: glenn_e_wilson / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary mockingbird (Photo: J Labrador / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary mockingbird (Photo: J Labrador / CC BY 2.0)
  35. Mouse

    Albino mouse (Foto: Tambako The Jaguar / CC BY-ND 2.0)
    Albino mouse (Foto: Tambako The Jaguar / CC BY-ND 2.0)
    Ordinary mouse (photo: Tambako The Jaguar / CC BY-ND 2.0)
    Ordinary mouse (Photo: Tambako The Jaguar / CC BY-ND 2.0)
  36. Muskrat

    Albino muskrat (Photo: USFWS Mountain-Prairie / CC BY 2.0)
    Albino muskrat (Photo: USFWS Mountain-Prairie / CC BY 2.0)
    Muskrat (Photo: CheepShot / CC BY 2.0)
    Muskrat (Photo: CheepShot / CC BY 2.0)
  37. Scorpionfish

    Albino scorpionfish (Photo: Makuahine Pa'i Ki'i / CC BY 2.0)
    Albino scorpionfish (Photo: Makuahine Pa’i Ki’i / CC BY 2.0)
    Scorpionfish (Photo: Michael Bentley / CC BY 2.0)
    Scorpionfish (Photo: Michael Bentley / CC BY 2.0)
  38. Starling

    albino/leucistic starling  (Photo: barry jones / CC BY 2.0)
    Albino/leucistic starling (Photo: barry jones / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary starling (Photo: Stig Nygaard / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary starling (Photo: Stig Nygaard / CC BY 2.0)
  39. Tiger

    The imposing feline sometimes makes their appearance in white. Although not common, there have been several specimens of white tigers. But usually they are not albino – it’s just a depigmentation, black bars remain visible (to the delight of viewers). In fact, there exists only one documented meeting with albino tigers: in 1922, when two specimens were killed in Bengal 7)The genetics of the white tigers of Rewa” by Ian W.B. Thornton, K.K. Yeung andK. S. Sankhala, article published in Journal of Zoology in May 1967. However, there are cases of white tigers so depigmented, that hardly a trace of color is observed.

    Tiger leucistic
    Tiger leucistic
    Ordinary tiger
    Ordinary tiger
  40. Wallaby

    Albino Wallaby (Photo: thethrillstheyyield / CC BY ND 2.0)
    Albino Wallaby (Photo: thethrillstheyyield / CC BY ND 2.0)
    Ordinary Wallaby
    Ordinary Wallaby
  41. Pacu

    Albino pacu
    Pacu

  42. Golden jackal

    Albino golden jackal
    Golden jackal

  43. Water buffalo

    Albino water buffalo (Photo: Evelyn Avila / CC BY 2.0)
    Albino water buffalo (Photo: Evelyn Avila / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary water buffalo (Photo: Ben Burkland, Carolyn Cook / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary water buffalo (Photo: Ben Burkland, Carolyn Cook / CC BY 2.0)
  44. Moose

    Albino Moose
    Albino Moose
    Ordinary Moose (Photo: Chris Lott / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary Moose (Photo: Chris Lott / CC BY 2.0)
  45. Python

    Albino python
    Albino python
    Ordinary python
    Ordinary python
  46. Magpie

    Albino/leucistic magpie (Photo: Sefie Bee / CC BY 2.0)
    Albino/leucistic magpie (Photo: Sefie Bee / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary magpie (Photo: Elspeth and Evan / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary magpie (Photo: Elspeth and Evan / CC BY 2.0)
  47. Blackbird

    It should be a black bird, as the name say it. But sometimes it can be white too!

    Albino blackbird (Photo: Michele Lamberti / CC BY 2.0)
    Albino blackbird (Photo: Michele Lamberti / CC BY 2.0)
    Blackbird (Foto: Mike Baird / CC BY 2.0)
    Blackbird (Foto: Mike Baird / CC BY 2.0)
  48. Kookaburra

    Albino Kookaburra
    Albino Kookaburra
    Ordinary Kookaburra (Photo: Lenore Edman / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary Kookaburra (Photo: Lenore Edman / CC BY 2.0)
  49. Welcome swallow

    Leucistic welcome swallow
    Welcome swallow

  50. Lion

    King of the animals could not miss the opportunity to expand its dominion over the creatures that are white too. But to speak the truth, albino lions are extremely rare. Most famous ones are the so-called “white lions” who appear in the Timbavati region of South Africa. They are leucistic with different light shades, sometimes almost white 8)White lion” in Wikipedia.

    Leucistic lion (Photo: shankar s. / CC BY 2.0)
    Leucistic lion (Photo: shankar s. / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary lion (Photo: Tambako The Jaguar / CC BY 2.0)
    Ordinary lion (Photo: Tambako The Jaguar / CC BY 2.0)

Different animals can sometimes be seen in white, even if it’s not typical, but without albinism or a similar anomaly. For example, dingoes rarely have the fur completely white, usually with only white parts. Or flamingos, whom everyone knows to be pink, actually are white and become pink because of a diet rich in carotene; a white flamingo is just a hungry flamingo 9)Flamingo“in Wikipedia.

Surprise bonus: When you see black in front of your eyes

Can you withstand?! You must persist a little – even if you see black before your eyes!

The opposite extreme of albinism is melanism. Melanin is present so much, that it makes everything black.

The king of melanism – the most well-known animal with this feature – is the Black Panther. The term panther indicates not an animal species, but a whole family of cats: leopard, jaguar, tiger and lion (yes, even the lion is a panther – scientific name is Panthera Leo). Therefore, in Asia and Africa, black panthers are leopards, and in the Americas are jaguars.

Melanistic jaguar(Black Panther)
Melanistic jaguar (Black Panther)
Ordinary jaguar
Ordinary jaguar

A melanistic animal that’s easy to find is the black wolf. This is not a separate species, but just a gray wolf. Studies show that black wolves came into being as a result of hybridization with dogs 10)Molecular and Evolutionary History of Melanism in North American Gray Wolves” – study by Tovi M. Anderson, Bridgett M. vonHoldt, Sophie I. Candille, Marco Musiani, Claudia Greco, Daniel R. Stahler, Douglas W. Smith, Badri Padhukasahasram, Ettore Randi, Jennifer A. Leonard, Carlos D. Bustamante, Elaine A. Ostrander, Hua Tang, Robert K. Wayne, Gregory S. Barsh, published in Science on March 6, 200911)”The Wolves of Mount McKinley” by Adolph Murie, book published by University of Washington Press in 1944. It is interesting that when a black wolf mates with a gray one, the cubs are rather black. In some forests, black wolves have become dominant by number – the anomaly now becomes normality.

Black wolf (Photo: USFWS Mountain-Prairie / CC BY 2.0)
Black wolf (Photo: USFWS Mountain-Prairie / CC BY 2.0)
Gray wolf (Photo: Lennart Tange / CC BY 2.0)
Gray wolf (Photo: Lennart Tange / CC BY 2.0)

The melanistic squirrel is a shocking appearance. She looks as if she played all night in a coal bucket. At how many mixed feelings it gives you, one wonders how come no one has turned her into a symbol of darkness yet.

Melanistic squirrel (Photo: Robert Taylor / CC BY 2.0)
Melanistic squirrel (Photo: Robert Taylor / CC BY 2.0)
Ordinary squirrel (Photo: Håkan Dahlström / CC BY 2.0)
Ordinary squirrel (Photo: Håkan Dahlström / CC BY 2.0)

Melanistic snakes have an addition of sobriety. It’s like they put black suit and gown and say: Let the conccccert sssstart!

Melanistic snakes (Photo: Benny Mazur / CC BY 2.0)
Melanistic snakes (Photo: Benny Mazur / CC BY 2.0)
Ordinary snakes (Photo: Ingrid Taylar / CC BY 2.0)
Ordinary snakes (Photo: Ingrid Taylar / CC BY 2.0)

In case you didn’t get it yet: If you click on any picture, it will be enlarged.


Article written exclusively for Miratico by Lucian Velea
Lucian Velea is the founder of Miratico and many other online projects.

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References   [ + ]

1, 4. Albino Animals” by Kelly Milner Halls, book published by Millbrook Press in 2004
2. ”Macropod Husbandry, Healthcare and Medicinals” by Lynda Staker, book published in 2014
3. Snowflake (gorilla)” in Wikipedia
5. What a peacock sees when it looks at a potential mate – and what your dog actually sees when you throw a ball” by Rob Waugh, article published in Daily Mail on july 3, 2012
6. Simple Beauty: In Praise of the New Zealand White” by Suzanne Rubins
7. The genetics of the white tigers of Rewa” by Ian W.B. Thornton, K.K. Yeung andK. S. Sankhala, article published in Journal of Zoology in May 1967
8. White lion” in Wikipedia
9. Flamingo“in Wikipedia
10. Molecular and Evolutionary History of Melanism in North American Gray Wolves” – study by Tovi M. Anderson, Bridgett M. vonHoldt, Sophie I. Candille, Marco Musiani, Claudia Greco, Daniel R. Stahler, Douglas W. Smith, Badri Padhukasahasram, Ettore Randi, Jennifer A. Leonard, Carlos D. Bustamante, Elaine A. Ostrander, Hua Tang, Robert K. Wayne, Gregory S. Barsh, published in Science on March 6, 2009
11. ”The Wolves of Mount McKinley” by Adolph Murie, book published by University of Washington Press in 1944

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